What is Shoulder Replacement Surgery?

If you haven't experienced adequate results with medication and other conservative treatments, your surgeon may recommend shoulder replacement surgery, which may allow you to return to the everyday activities you enjoy.1

Learn about shoulder replacement.



Shoulder Replacement

Shoulder replacement is a surgical procedure in which the diseased or damaged joint is replaced with an artificial joint called an implant or prosthesis.

During surgery, parts of the humerus (long arm bone) and the glenoid (shoulder socket) are replaced with metal and polyethylene (a plastic) components called implants. These components work together to try and help relieve your shoulder pain and function.

Like any surgery, shoulder replacement surgery has serious risks.

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Arthritic shoulder 83d58b6c0d82eb582f2e29f3841d0274a53c69407bdf89cf963b2488e87c931a
Replaced shoulder 0feeea9f0e1254c13ff25b935bacdc324be6e191e2b6ba03d2c0009a37844608

Shoulder implants are designed to enable the joint to move more similar to that of a healthy, functioning joint When speaking with your surgeon about shoulder replacement surgery, it is important to understand the different surgical techniques and options available to you in addressing your joint pain.

When learning about surgical treatment options, a few common terms to know are TSA, Total Shoulder Arthroplasty, and RSA, Reverse shoulder arthroplasty. Arthroplasty is a medical term used to describe a procedure in which the effected joint is reconstructed or replaced which may allow it to move more naturally after the procedure.

Both, a TSA and RSA are intended to relieve pain and restore some function in the shoulder. The surgical approach, or incision for a TSA and RSA are very similar and involve the restoration of the ball (humeral head) and socket (glenoid implant). There are other surgical options such a hemi arthroplasty (or partial shoulder replacement) where only the humeral head is replaced due to various reasons, an example being avascular necrosis.7

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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT SHOULDER REPLACEMENT

ReUnion System Indications for Use:

For use as a Hemi or Total Shoulder Replacement: Aseptic necrosis of the humeral head; Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or posttraumatic arthritis; Proximal humeral fracture and/or dislocation; Clinical management problems where arthrodesis or alternative reconstructive techniques are less likely to achieve satisfactory results; Revision of previous unsuccessful total shoulder replacement, resurfacing or other procedure.

Glenoid components are intended for cemented use only. The humeral stem components are intended for both cemented and cementless use. In the case of revision, when ReUnion TSA humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a total shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral and glenoid components, if the natural glenoid provides sufficient bone stock, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a hemiarthroplasty to a total shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing total shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary total shoulder arthroplasty. It is also indicated for conversion to a hemiarthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral components, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a total or ReUnion RSA reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a hemiarthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing hemiarthroplasty to a secondary hemiarthroplasty, in treatment of previously failed shoulder arthroplasty cases where revision to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty is inappropriate.

ReUnion Reverse Arthroplasty System (RSA): The ReUnion RSA Shoulder System is intended for primary, fracture, or revision of total Shoulder replacement. The patient’s joint must be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the selected implant(s), and a functional deltoid muscle is necessary to use the device. The patient’s joint must have gross rotator cuff deficiency, a functional deltoid muscle and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the selected implant(s). Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis; Proximal humeral fracture; Revision of previously failed shoulder joint replacement; Glenoid Baseplate components are intended for cementless use with the addition of screw fixation; The Humeral Stem components are intended for both cemented and cementless use; In the case of revision, when ReUnion TSA humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

In conjunction with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a hemi or total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary reverse shoulder arthroplasty, in treatment of a grossly deficient rotator cuff with sever arthropathy or previously failed joint replacement with a grossly deficient rotator cuff. The patient must have a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s).

The ReUnion RFX System, when used with ReUnion TSA Humeral and Glenoid components, is indicated for use as a Hemi or Total Shoulder Replacement: Aseptic necrosis of the humeral head; Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or posttraumatic Arthritis; Proximal humeral fractures and/or dislocation; Clinical management problems where arthrodesis or alternative reconstructive techniques are less likely to achieve satisfactory results; Revision of previous unsuccessful total shoulder replacement, resurfacing or other procedure. In the case of revision, when ReUnion RFX humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a total shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral and glenoid components, if the natural glenoid provides sufficient bone stock, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a hemiarthroplasty to a total shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing total shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary total shoulder arthroplasty. It is also indicated for conversion to a hemiarthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral components, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a total or reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a hemiarthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing hemiarthroplasty to a secondary hemiarthroplasty, in treatment of previously failed shoulder arthroplasty cases where revision to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty is inappropriate. The glenoid components are intended for cemented use only. When used with ReUnion RSA Humeral and Glenoid Components

The ReUnion RFX System, when used with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, is intended for primary, fracture, or revision total shoulder replacement. The patient’s joint must have gross rotator cuff deficiency, a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s). Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from degenerative arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis; Proximal humeral fractures; Revisions of previously failed shoulder joint replacements.

In the case of revision, when ReUnion RFX humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a hemi or total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary reverse shoulder arthroplasty, in treatment of a grossly deficient rotator cuff with severe arthropathy or previously failed joint replacement with a grossly deficient rotator cuff. The patient must have a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s). Glenoid Baseplate components are intended for cementless use with the addition of screw fixation. Source: Stryker Instructions for Use K161863


The information presented is for educational purposes only. Stryker is not dispensing medical advice. Please speak to your doctor to decide which type of surgery is right for you. Only your doctor can make the medical judgment which products and treatments are right for your own individual condition. As with any surgery, joint replacement surgery carries certain risks. Your surgeon will explain all the possible complications of the surgery, as well as side effects. Additionally, the lifetime of a joint replacement product is not infinite and varies with each individual. Also, each patient will experience a different post-operative activity level, depending on their own individual clinical factors. Your doctor will help counsel you about how to best maintain your activities in order to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device.

Stryker Corporation or its divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: ReUnion, SmartLock, SOMA, Stryker, X3. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners or holders.
Content ID: RU-AWI-1, 05-2017

References

  1. Wiater, J. Michael, MD. "Shoulder Joint Replacement." Ortho Info. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Dec. 2011. Web. Feb. 2017.
  2. "Arthritis Facts." Arthritis Foundation. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web.
  3. SmartTrak US Upper Extremity Internal Fixation Market Projections
  4. Nam, David et al. " Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy: Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment" J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2012;94:e34(1-11)
  5. Armstrong, April D., MD, and George S. Athwal, MD. "Rotator Cuff Tears." Rotator Cuff Tears-OrthoInfo - AAOS. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 01 Mar. 2017. Web. 06 Feb. 2017.
  6. "What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?" Arthritis Foundation. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web. Feb. 2017
  7. Avascular Necrosis AVN of the Shoulder." Avascular Necrosis (AVN) Charity UK. Avascular Necrosis (AVN) Charity UK, 1 Jan. 2015. Web. Feb. 2017.
  8. Exercising with Osteoarthritis." Exercising with Osteoarthritis. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web. Mar. 2017
  9. Edwards, T.B. et al. “A Comparison of Hemiarthroplasty and Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in the Treatment of primary Glenohumeral Arthritis: Results of a Multicenter Study.” JSES. May 2003: 12:207-213.
  10. SmartTrak US Shoulder Replacement Procedure Market Projections
  11. Phoenix Shoulder and Knee. "The Benefits of Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement." The Benefits of Reverse Shoulder Total Shoulder Replacement. Phoenix Shoulder & Knee, 31 Oct. 2013. Web.
  12. Liu JN., et al. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty: as systemic review and meta-analysis. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2017 Apr 17
  13. Anatomy Diagrams designed with the use of: Terry, et al. Functional anatomy of the shoulder. J Athletic Training 2000;35(3):248-255
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