Mako Total Knee replacement

Over the years, knee replacement techniques and instrumentation have undergone countless improvements. Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology with Triathlon Total Knee implants is an example of how technology is transforming the way joint replacement surgeries are being performed.

When you hear ‘robotic-arm assisted technology,’ it’s important to understand that the Mako Robotic-Arm doesn’t actually perform the surgery. Surgery is performed by an orthopaedic surgeon, who uses the Mako System software to pre-plan your surgery. Your orthopaedic surgeon will guide the Mako robotic-arm to remove diseased bone and cartilage. Then the surgeon will insert a Triathlon Total Knee implant.

Mako Technology was designed to help surgeons provide patients with a personalized surgical experience based on their specific diagnosis and anatomy.

Triathlon Total Knee implant

With over a decade of clinical history, Triathlon single-radius knees are different than traditional knee replacements because they are designed to work with the body to promote natural-like circular motion.1-4 This is due to the single radius design of the knee implant. Single radius means that as your knee flexes, the radius is the same, similar to a circle, potentially requiring less effort from your quadriceps muscle.3,5,6

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Since the thigh muscle (the quadriceps) is attached to your knee, it is unavoidably involved in the surgery. Therefore, the quadriceps muscle can become a source of discomfort or pain during your recovery period. The quadriceps muscle plays an important role in your ability to move your legs so it also has a major impact on your recovery and how quickly you can get back to living your life.7

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How it Works
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Before surgery

It all begins with a CT scan of your knee joint that is used to generate a 3D virtual model of your unique anatomy. This virtual model is loaded into the Mako System software and is used by your surgeon to create your personalized pre-operative plan.

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In the Operating Room

In the operating room, your surgeon will use the Mako System to assist in performing your surgery based on your personalized pre-operative plan. When the surgeon prepares the bone for the implant, the surgeon guides the robotic-arm within the pre-defined area and the Mako System helps the surgeon stay within the planned boundaries that were defined when the personalized pre-operative plan was created. The Mako System also allows your surgeon to make adjustments to your plan during surgery as needed. In a laboratory study, Mako Technology demonstrated accurate placement of implants to a personalized surgical plan.9 This study also showed that Mako Total Knee replacement demonstrated soft tissue protection to the ligaments around the knee.9

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After Surgery

After surgery, your surgeon, nurses and physical therapists will set goals with you to get you back on the move. They will closely monitor your condition and progress. Your surgeon may review a post-operative x-ray of your new knee with you.

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Frequently asked questions

Q: Is Mako covered by health insurance providers?
A: We understand that making sure your total knee replacement is covered by health insurance is important to you. Check with your health insurance provider to verify your specific coverage.

Q: How long has the Mako procedure been available?
A: The first Mako procedure was a partial knee replacement performed in June of 2006. Since that time, over 83,000 Mako hip and knee replacement procedures have been performed around the world.10

Q: Does the Mako robotic-arm actually perform surgery?
A: No, the robotic-arm doesn’t perform surgery, nor can it make decisions on its own or move without the surgeon guiding it.

Q: How long to knee implants last?
A: Individual results vary and not all patients will have the same postoperative recovery and activity level. The lifetime of a knee replacement is not infinite and varies with each individual.

It's your move. Find a surgeon in your area familiar with the robotic-arm assisted surgery and see if total knee replacement is right for you.

Back on the Move
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Robert Malitz
Mako Total Knee
“I’ve been active my entire life.” For Robert, spending time with his two children, traveling, playing golf, tennis and hiking are just a few of his favorite activities. Over the years, all of this activity started to take its toll on Robert’s body. “My initial injury dated back to my high school football days. I tore my ACL and I didn’t get treated. I just kept pushing forward with my activities.” By the time Robert was 25, he had numerous knee scopes and an ACL reconstruction surgery.

“I knew I had a problem one day when I was playing basketball with my son. The next day I could barely walk. I could no longer ignore the pain.” A visit to an orthopaedic specialist confirmed that Robert had arthritis in his knee and that he was a candidate for total knee replacement.

Finding a reputable hospital and a surgeon he could trust was important to him, so Robert didn’t commit to surgery right after his first appointment. He decided to get a second opinion and searched for hospitals offering Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery. “When I first heard of Mako, I thought that it was great that a surgeon could use a robotic-arm to help perform my surgery. It was important to me that my surgeon use the latest technology.”

Now, Robert is back to walking the golf course rather than driving the golf cart. He’s also back to doing light yoga and hiking. “If you are limited in your day-to-day activities and it’s starting to affect you both mentally and physically, research your options. Technology has advanced so much over the years and I am so happy I got my knee replaced with Mako Technology.”

Individual results vary. Not all patients will have the same post-operative recovery and activity level. See your orthopaedic surgeon to discuss your potential benefits and risks.
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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT

Hip joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative and rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, fracture of the neck of the femur or functional deformity of the hip.

Knee joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid and post-traumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee. Joint replacement surgery is not appropriate for patients with certain types of infections, any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of prosthesis instability, prosthesis fixation failure or complications in postoperative care, compromised bone stock, skeletal immaturity, severe instability of the joint, or excessive body weight.

Like any surgery, joint replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, pain, bone fracture, change in the treated leg length (hip), joint stiffness, hip joint fusion, amputation, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death.

Implant related risks which may lead to a revision of the implant include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), audible sounds during motion, and reaction to particle debris.

The information presented is for educational purposes only. Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is appropriate for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will return to the same activity level. The lifetime of any joint replacement is limited and depends on several factors like patient weight and activity level. Your doctor will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It is important to closely follow your physician’s instructions regarding post-surgery activity, treatment and follow-up care.

Ask your doctor if a joint replacement is right for you.

Stryker Corporation or its other divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: GetAroundKnee, Mako, Mobile Bearing Hip, Stryker, Together with our customers, we are driven to make healthcare better. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners or holders.

Stryker is a sponsor of the PGA TOUR. Hal Sutton and Fred Funk are paid spokespersons of Stryker, and their statements represent their personal views based on their personal experiences.

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References

  1. Mistry J, Elmallah R, Chughtai M, Oktem M, Harwin S, Mont M. Long-Term Survivorship andClinical Outcomes of a Single Radius Total Knee Arthroplasty. International XXVIII.
  2. Designed to maintain collateral ligament stability throughout the range of motion. Stryker-Initiated Dynamic Computer Simulations of Passive ROM and Oxford Rig Test, Stephen Piazza, 2003.
  3. Wang H, Simpson KJ, Ferrara MS, Chamnongkich S, Kinsey T, Mahoney, OM. Biomechanical differences exhibited during sit-to-stand between total knee arthroplasty designs of varying radii. J Arthroplasty. 2006;21(8):1193-1199.
  4. Gómez-Barrena E, Fernandez-García C, Fernandez-Bravo A, Cutillas-Ruiz R, Bermejo-Fernandez G. Functional performance with a single-radius femoral design total knee arthroplasty. Clin Ortho Relates Res. 2010;468(5):1214-1220.
  5. Ostermeier S, Stukenborg-Colsman C. Quadriceps force after TKA with femoral single radius. Acts Ortho. 2011;82(3):339-343.
  6. Mahoney O, McClung C, dela Rosa M, Schmalzried T. The effect of total knee arthroplasty design on extensor mechanism function The Journal of Arthroplasty, Volume 17, Issue 4, June 2002, Pages 416-421.
  7. Harwin, S.F., Hitt, K, Greene, K.A. Early Experience with a New Total Knee Implant: Maximizing Range of Motion and Function with Gender-Specific Sizing Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Technology International, XVI. pgs. 1-7.
  8. Triathlon sales report: worldwide sales. Stryker Orthopaedics. 2016.
  9. Hampp E. et al. Robotic-Arm Assisted Total Knee Arthroplasty Demonstrated Greater Accuracy to Plan Compared to Manual Technique. Orthopaedic Research Society 2017 Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. Poster No. 2412. March 20-22, 2017.
  10. Stryker sales data.
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