Stryker's Mobile Bearing Hip System
The Mobile Bearing Hip replacement from Stryker is an innovation in hip replacement design. To help alleviate your hip pain and get you back to living your life, your doctor wants to ensure that the implant he or she selects for you is designed to potentially allow for performance over time.
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X3 Precisely Engineered Polyethylene

Stryker's Mobile Bearing Hip is a mobile bearing rather than a fixed bearing hip replacement. Mobile bearing hip replacement components, with X3 Precisely Engineered Polyethylene, are designed to fit together in a unique way to potentially allow for natural range of motion1, enhanced joint stability1 and minimize the risk of wear and consequently may help prolong the life of the implant.2,3

It's Your Move. Find a surgeon in your area who is familiar with Stryker Hips and see if hip replacement is right for you.

Back on the Move.
Hal hip 1ad39f21589362e73e559cdb5cd01f612ec60ea0933348c6c8dc1f3dde8c73df
Hal Sutton
Champions Tour Professional and Mobile Bearing Hip Patient
"Every day I waited is a day I'll never get back. I only wish I had replaced my hip sooner." Individual results vary. Not all patients will have the same post-operative recovery and activity level. See your orthopaedic surgeon to discuss your potential benefits and risks.
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Hip joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative and rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, fracture of the neck of the femur or functional deformity of the hip.

Knee joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid and post-traumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee. Joint replacement surgery is not appropriate for patients with certain types of infections, any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of prosthesis instability, prosthesis fixation failure or complications in postoperative care, compromised bone stock, skeletal immaturity, severe instability of the joint, or excessive body weight.

Like any surgery, joint replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, pain, bone fracture, change in the treated leg length (hip), joint stiffness, hip joint fusion, amputation, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death.

Implant related risks which may lead to a revision of the implant include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), audible sounds during motion, and reaction to particle debris.

The information presented is for educational purposes only. Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is appropriate for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will return to the same activity level. The lifetime of any joint replacement is limited and depends on several factors like patient weight and activity level. Your doctor will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It is important to closely follow your physician’s instructions regarding post-surgery activity, treatment and follow-up care.

Ask your doctor if a joint replacement is right for you.

Stryker Corporation or its other divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: GetAroundKnee, Mako, Mobile Bearing Hip, Stryker, Together with our customers, we are driven to make healthcare better. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners or holders.

Stryker is a sponsor of the PGA TOUR. Hal Sutton and Fred Funk are paid spokespersons of Stryker, and their statements represent their personal views based on their personal experiences.



  1. Heffernan C., Bhimji, S., Macintyre, J., et al. (2011). Development and Validation of a Novel Modular Dual Mobility Hip Bearing. ORS Annual Meeting Poster #1165.
  2. Stryker Orthopaedics Restoration® ADM X3® 28 mm ID acetabular inserts made of X3® Gas Plasma Sterilized UHMWPE, show a 97% reduction in volumetric wear rate versus 28 mm ID Restoration® ADM Duration Gamma Radiation Sterilized UHMWPE. Both ADM constructs utilized a 54mm OD shell and the inserts were approximately 9.9 mm thick. Testing was conducted under multi-axial hip joint simulation for 5 million cycles using a 28mm CoCr modular femoral head articulating counterface and calf serum lubricant. Volumetric wear rates were 109.7±6.0 mm3/106 cycles and -1.03 ± 3.8 mm3/106 cycles for Duration and X3® polyethylene insert test samples. Although in-vitro hip wear simulation methods have not been shown to quantitatively predict clinical wear performance, the current model has been able to reproduce correct wear resistance rankings for some materials with documented clinical results.¹¯³
      A. Wang, A., et al., Tribology International, Vol. 31, No. 1-3:17-33, 1998.
      B. Essner, A., et al., 44th Annual Meeting, ORS, New Orleans, Mar. 16-19, 1998:774.
      C. Essner, A., et al., 47th Annual Meeting, ORS, San Francisco, Feb. 25-28, 2001:1007.
  3. Herrera, L., Lee, R., Longaray, J., et al. (2010). Edge Loading Wear due to Inclination Angle for Three Contemporary Hip Bearings. 56th Annual ORS Meeting. Poster #2259.
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