Stryker's GetAroundKnee™ System
Sometimes Circles Just Make Sense

Stryker’s single-radius knees have been used in more than 1 million knee replacement surgeries worldwide since 1996.1

Stryker knee replacements are different than traditional knee replacements because they are designed to work with the body to promote natural-like circular motion.2,3,4 This is due to the single radius design of the knee implant. Single radius means that as your knee flexes, the radius is the same, similar to a circle, potentially requiring less effort from your quadriceps muscle.3,5,7

The GetAroundKnee System from Stryker is designed to replace the knee's naturally circular motion.2,3,4 Other knee systems follow an oval motion.2,3,4 The GetAroundKnee is designed to offer enhanced stability through the active range of motion.2,3,4

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Since the thigh muscle (the quadriceps) is attached to your knee, it is unavoidably involved in the surgery. Therefore, the quadriceps muscle can become a source of discomfort or pain during your recovery period. The quadriceps muscle plays an important role in your ability to move your legs so it also has a major impact on your recovery and how quickly you can get back to living your life.6

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It's Your Move. Find a surgeon in your area familiar with the GetAroundKnee and see if knee replacement is right for you.

Back on the Move
Fred knee abffdea7f6fb7b6d63f5ebe06440e6f0d0af08c09b0232dcf10070912133fb5e
Fred Funk
PGA TOUR Professional and GetAroundKnee Patient
"Having my knee replaced gave me a chance to continue playing golf. It's still one of the best decisions I've ever made". Individual results vary. Not all patients will have the same post-operative recovery and activity level. See your orthopaedic surgeon to discuss your potential benefits and risks.
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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT

Hip joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative and rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, fracture of the neck of the femur or functional deformity of the hip.

Knee joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid and post-traumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee. Joint replacement surgery is not appropriate for patients with certain types of infections, any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of prosthesis instability, prosthesis fixation failure or complications in postoperative care, compromised bone stock, skeletal immaturity, severe instability of the joint, or excessive body weight.

Like any surgery, joint replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, pain, bone fracture, change in the treated leg length (hip), joint stiffness, hip joint fusion, amputation, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death.

Implant related risks which may lead to a revision of the implant include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), audible sounds during motion, and reaction to particle debris.

The information presented is for educational purposes only. Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is appropriate for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will return to the same activity level. The lifetime of any joint replacement is limited and depends on several factors like patient weight and activity level. Your doctor will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It is important to closely follow your physician’s instructions regarding post-surgery activity, treatment and follow-up care.

Ask your doctor if a joint replacement is right for you.

Stryker Corporation or its other divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: GetAroundKnee, Mako, Mobile Bearing Hip, Stryker, Together with our customers, we are driven to make healthcare better. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners or holders.

Stryker is a sponsor of the PGA TOUR. Hal Sutton and Fred Funk are paid spokespersons of Stryker, and their statements represent their personal views based on their personal experiences.

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References

  1. Triathlon sales report: worldwide sales. Stryker Orthopaedics. 2014.
  2. Designed to maintain collateral ligament stability throughout the range of motion. Stryker-Initiated Dynamic Computer Simulations of Passive ROM and Oxford Rig Test, Stephen Piazza, 2003.
  3. Wang H, Simpson KJ, Ferrara MS, Chamnongkich S, Kinsey T, Mahoney, OM. Biomechanical differences exhibited during sit-to-stand between total knee arthroplasty designs of varying radii. J Arthroplasty. 2006;21(8):1193-1199.
  4. Gómez-Barrena E, Fernandez-García C, Fernandez-Bravo A, Cutillas-Ruiz R, Bermejo-Fernandez G. Functional performance with a single-radius femoral design total knee arthroplasty. Clin Ortho Relates Res. 2010;468(5):1214-1220.
  5. Ostermeier S, Stukenborg-Colsman C. Quadriceps force after TKA with femoral single radius. Acts Ortho. 2011;82(3):339-343.
  6. Harwin, S.F., Hitt, K, Greene, K.A. Early Experience with a New Total Knee Implant: Maximizing Range of Motion and Function with Gender-Specific Sizing Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Technology International, XVI. pgs. 1-7.
  7. Mahoney O, McClung C, dela Rosa M, Schmalzried T. The effect of total knee arthroplasty design on extensor mechanism function The Journal of Arthroplasty, Volume 17, Issue 4, June 2002, Pages 416-421.
  8. AAOS Website, orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00389, accessed October 2014.
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