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Christopher Sherrell, M.D.

Hip Knee Partial knee replacement Mobile bearing hip
Knoxville Orthopaedic Clinic
7557 Dannaher Lane Suite 6-10 Powell, TN 37849
Directions

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Additional Locations

260 Ft Sanders West Blvd Building 6 Knoxville, TN 37922
1422 Old Weisgarber Rd Knoxville, TN 37909
120 Hospital Dr #250, Jefferson City, TN 37760

Hospital Affiliation(s)

  • Park West Medical Center
  • Physicians Regional Medical Center

Residency

  • Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, 2008

Fellowship

  • Adult Reconstruction, OrthoCarolina, Charlotte, North Carolina, 2009

Languages

  • English

About Dr. Sherrell

BIOGRAPHY Dr. J. Christopher Sherrell returned to Tennessee in 2009 to practice medicine with Knoxville Orthopaedic Clinic.

His interests in the area of adult reconstructive surgery include treatment of degenerative, inflammatory, and post-traumatic arthritis and fractures of the hip and knee. He has co-authored a number of articles on these topics for publication in professional journals and has participated in numerous presentations at medical conferences across the country.

An alumnus of Bearden High School in Knoxville, Dr. Sherrell graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis and then completed two years of general surgery residency there. He did an orthopaedic surgery residency at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville and his fellowship in adult reconstructive surgery at OrthoCarolina in Charlotte. A paper co-authored by Dr. Sherrell was recognized in 2010 by The Knee Society with the prestigious Chitranjan Ranawat Award for best work on a surgical technique.

Dr. Sherrell gains tremendous satisfaction from helping patients disabled by arthritic joints regain pain-free function and return to their livelihoods. When measured in terms of restoring a patient’s qualify of life, he believes that total hip replacement surgery is the most successful operation in the history of medicine.

Dr. Sherrell’s decision to become a physician was greatly influenced by his early love of life sciences, his desire to help people, and his parents. His mother worked as a nurse in the Knoxville area for 40 years, and she shared her values in the area of patient care with him. From his father, he learned “how to fix almost anything.”

Dr. Sherrell is married to Sydney Wallace Sherrell, an orthopaedic nurse practitioner and the granddaughter of retired KOC surgeon Dr. Sidney Wallace. Dr. Sherrell enjoys spending time with his three children, bass fishing on the numerous lakes and rivers in East Tennessee, and attending sporting events with his family. The Sherrells are especially fans of the University of Tennessee Volunteers.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT

Hip joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative and rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, fracture of the neck of the femur or functional deformity of the hip.

Knee joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid and post-traumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee. Joint replacement surgery is not appropriate for patients with certain types of infections, any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of prosthesis instability, prosthesis fixation failure or complications in postoperative care, compromised bone stock, skeletal immaturity, severe instability of the joint, or excessive body weight.

Like any surgery, joint replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, pain, bone fracture, change in the treated leg length (hip), joint stiffness, hip joint fusion, amputation, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death.

Implant related risks which may lead to a revision of the implant include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), audible sounds during motion, and reaction to particle debris.

The information presented is for educational purposes only. Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is appropriate for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will return to the same activity level. The lifetime of any joint replacement is limited and depends on several factors like patient weight and activity level. Your doctor will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It is important to closely follow your physician’s instructions regarding post-surgery activity, treatment and follow-up care.

Ask your doctor if a joint replacement is right for you.

Stryker Corporation or its other divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: GetAroundKnee, Mako, Mobile Bearing Hip, Stryker, Together with our customers, we are driven to make healthcare better. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners or holders.

Stryker is a sponsor of the PGA TOUR. Hal Sutton and Fred Funk are paid spokespersons of Stryker, and their statements represent their personal views based on their personal experiences.

GSNPS-PE-26-A

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT ANKLE REPLACEMENT

Indications: The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR Ankle) is indicated for use as a non-cemented implant to replace a painful arthritic ankle joint due to osteoarthritis, post-traumatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

Contra-Indications: Active or prior deep infection in the ankle joint or adjacent bones, Skeletal immaturity, Bone stock inadequate to support the device including: Severe osteoporotic or osteopenia condition or other conditions resulting in poor bone quality , Avascular necrosis of the talus, Prior surgery and / or injury that has adversely affected ankle bone quality, Malalignment or severe deformity of involved or adjacent anatomic structures including: Hindfoot or forefoot malalignment precluding plantigrade foot, Significant malalignment of the knee joint. Insufficient ligament support that cannot be repaired with soft tissue stabilization, Neuromuscular disease resulting in lack of normal muscle function about the affected ankle, Lower extremity vascular insufficiency demonstrated by Doppler arterial pressure, Charcot joint or peripheral neuropathy that may lead to Charcot joint of the affected ankle, Prior arthrodesis at the ankle joint , Poor skin and soft tissue quality about the surgical site.

Common Side Effects from Total Ankle Replacement Surgery: For the first two weeks after surgery it is normal to have a moderate amount of pain. You may need to use pain medicine(s). This pain may slowly decrease over time, but it is not unusual to experience some discomfort for up to three months and swelling may continue for up to a year after surgery. Contact your surgeon right away if at any time you notice: Fluid leaking from your wound, Redness around your wound, Pain or swelling that starts suddenly (especially after an ankle twist or fall) or Severe pain after the initial two weeks following your surgery.

The T2 Ankle Arthrodesis Nail is intended for tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis (fusion) and to provide stabilization of the hindfoot and ankle including the transverse tarsal joints coupling the mid-foot to the hindfoot. Examples of specific indications include: Post-traumatic or primary arthrosis, previously infected arthrosis (second degree), revision of Failed Ankle arthrodesis, failed Total Ankle Replacement, avascular Necrosis of the Talus (requiring tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis), Neuroarthropathy or Neuromuscular Deformity or other neuromuscular disease with severe deformity or instability of the ankle, rheumatoid arthritis with severe deformity such as rheumatoid hindfoot, osteoarthritis, nonunions or pseudarthrosis of hindfoot and distal tibia, malunited tibial pilon fracture, charcot foot, severe endstage degenerative arthritis, severe defects after tumor resection pantalar arthrodesis.

Contraindications: The physician’s education, training and professional judgement must be relied upon to choose the most appropriate device and treatment. Conditions presenting an increased risk of failure include: any active or suspected latent infection or marked local inflammation in or about the affected area. Compromised vascularity that would inhibit adequate blood supply to the fracture or the operative site. Bone stock compromised by disease, infection or prior implantation that can not provide adequate support and/or fixation of the devices. Material sensitivity, documented or suspected. Obesity. An overweight or obese patient can produce loads on the implant that can lead to failure of the fixation of the device or to failure of the device itself. Patients having inadequate tissue coverage over the operative site. Implant utilization that would interfere with anatomical structures or physiological performance. Any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of fixation failure or complications in postoperative care. Other medical or surgical conditions which would preclude the potential benefit of surgery. The T2 Ankle Arthrodesis Nail should NOT be used if following conditions are present: tibial malalignment of > 10˚ in any plane, severe vascular deficiency, osteomyelitis or soft tissue infection.

The information presented is for educational purposes only. Stryker is not dispensing medical advice. Please speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is right for you. Only your doctor can make the medical judgment which products and treatments are right for your own individual condition. As with any surgery, joint replacement carries certain risks. Your surgeon will explain all the possible complications of the surgery, as well as side effects. Additionally, the lifetime of a joint replacement is not infinite and varies with each individual. Also, each patient will experience a different postoperative activity level, depending on their own individual clinical factors. Your doctor will help counsel you about how to best maintain your activities in order to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device. Such strategies include not engaging in high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight.

CP-AWI-1, 12-2015

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