What to Expect in the Weeks Prior to Surgery
Preparing for shoulder replacement begins weeks before the actual surgery. It's important to be in the best possible health prior to your shoulder replacement as it may help you during the recovery process. The checklist below outlines some tasks that your surgeon may ask you to complete in the weeks prior to your surgery date.

Considerations When Preparing for Surgery

  • Exercise under your doctor's supervision
  • Have a general physical examination
  • Have a dental examination
  • Review medications
  • Stop smoking
  • Lose weight
  • Arrange a pre‐operative visit
  • Get laboratory tests
  • Complete forms
  • Prepare meals
  • Confer with a physical therapist
  • Plan for post‐surgery rehabilitative care
  • Fast the night before
  • Bathe surgical area with antiseptic solution
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What to Expect on the Day of Surgery
Every hospital has its own particular procedures on the day of surgery. Make sure you discuss any procedures that they may have in place with your healthcare provider. Shoulder replacement patients may expect their day‐of‐surgery experience to follow this basic routine:

What to Expect the Day of Surgery

  • Dress comfortably when arriving at the hospitals you will need to change into a hospital gown prior to your surgery
  • Arrive at the hospital at the appointed time
  • Complete the admission process
  • An IV (intravenous) catheter for administration of fluids and antibiotics will be started
  • The anesthesiologist and operating room nurse may introduce themselves
  • Transportation to the operating room
  • Joint replacement surgery
  • Transportation to a recovery room
  • Ongoing monitoring of vital signs until condition is stabilized
  • Transportation to individual hospital room
  • Ongoing monitoring of vital signs and surgical dressing
  • Orientation to hospital routine
  • Diet of clear liquids or soft foods, as tolerated
  • The surgeon or surgeons assistant may check on you the day following surgery
  • Begin post-op activities taught during pre-op visit
  • Evaluation by physical therapist
  • When you are medically stable and cleared to be discharged, your surgeon may write discharge orders and instructions as a guideline for your return home
Talk to Your Doctor
As with any surgery, joint replacement carries certain risks. Your surgeon can explain all the possible complications and risks associated with the surgery, as well as side effects in greater detail. It is important to discuss both surgery and implant related risks with your physician. A list of some potential risks associated with shoulder replacement surgery include, but is not limited to: infection, blood clots, lung congestion, or pneumonia, metal allergies, glenoid loosening, erosion of unresurfaced glenoid, humeral loosening, stress fracture, dislocation, and persistent pain.

Surgery is a difficult decision. You should talk with your doctor to better understand the risks and complications before making the decision to undergo shoulder replacement. In a clinical article which reviewed and compared the results of various shoulder replacement surgeries and systems, over 80% of the 944 patients retruned to at least one or more sport, such as swimming and tennis.12

Speak with your physician to better understand the appropriate treatment options available to you.
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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT SHOULDER REPLACEMENT

ReUnion System Indications for Use:

For use as a Hemi or Total Shoulder Replacement: Aseptic necrosis of the humeral head; Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or posttraumatic arthritis; Proximal humeral fracture and/or dislocation; Clinical management problems where arthrodesis or alternative reconstructive techniques are less likely to achieve satisfactory results; Revision of previous unsuccessful total shoulder replacement, resurfacing or other procedure.

Glenoid components are intended for cemented use only. The humeral stem components are intended for both cemented and cementless use. In the case of revision, when ReUnion TSA humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a total shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral and glenoid components, if the natural glenoid provides sufficient bone stock, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a hemiarthroplasty to a total shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing total shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary total shoulder arthroplasty. It is also indicated for conversion to a hemiarthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral components, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a total or ReUnion RSA reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a hemiarthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing hemiarthroplasty to a secondary hemiarthroplasty, in treatment of previously failed shoulder arthroplasty cases where revision to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty is inappropriate.

ReUnion Reverse Arthroplasty System (RSA): The ReUnion RSA Shoulder System is intended for primary, fracture, or revision of total Shoulder replacement. The patient’s joint must be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the selected implant(s), and a functional deltoid muscle is necessary to use the device. The patient’s joint must have gross rotator cuff deficiency, a functional deltoid muscle and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the selected implant(s). Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis; Proximal humeral fracture; Revision of previously failed shoulder joint replacement; Glenoid Baseplate components are intended for cementless use with the addition of screw fixation; The Humeral Stem components are intended for both cemented and cementless use; In the case of revision, when ReUnion TSA humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

In conjunction with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a hemi or total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary reverse shoulder arthroplasty, in treatment of a grossly deficient rotator cuff with sever arthropathy or previously failed joint replacement with a grossly deficient rotator cuff. The patient must have a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s).

The ReUnion RFX System, when used with ReUnion TSA Humeral and Glenoid components, is indicated for use as a Hemi or Total Shoulder Replacement: Aseptic necrosis of the humeral head; Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or posttraumatic Arthritis; Proximal humeral fractures and/or dislocation; Clinical management problems where arthrodesis or alternative reconstructive techniques are less likely to achieve satisfactory results; Revision of previous unsuccessful total shoulder replacement, resurfacing or other procedure. In the case of revision, when ReUnion RFX humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a total shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral and glenoid components, if the natural glenoid provides sufficient bone stock, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a hemiarthroplasty to a total shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing total shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary total shoulder arthroplasty. It is also indicated for conversion to a hemiarthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral components, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a total or reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a hemiarthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing hemiarthroplasty to a secondary hemiarthroplasty, in treatment of previously failed shoulder arthroplasty cases where revision to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty is inappropriate. The glenoid components are intended for cemented use only. When used with ReUnion RSA Humeral and Glenoid Components

The ReUnion RFX System, when used with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, is intended for primary, fracture, or revision total shoulder replacement. The patient’s joint must have gross rotator cuff deficiency, a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s). Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from degenerative arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis; Proximal humeral fractures; Revisions of previously failed shoulder joint replacements.

In the case of revision, when ReUnion RFX humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a hemi or total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary reverse shoulder arthroplasty, in treatment of a grossly deficient rotator cuff with severe arthropathy or previously failed joint replacement with a grossly deficient rotator cuff. The patient must have a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s). Glenoid Baseplate components are intended for cementless use with the addition of screw fixation. Source: Stryker Instructions for Use K161863


The information presented is for educational purposes only. Stryker is not dispensing medical advice. Please speak to your doctor to decide which type of surgery is right for you. Only your doctor can make the medical judgment which products and treatments are right for your own individual condition. As with any surgery, joint replacement surgery carries certain risks. Your surgeon will explain all the possible complications of the surgery, as well as side effects. Additionally, the lifetime of a joint replacement product is not infinite and varies with each individual. Also, each patient will experience a different post-operative activity level, depending on their own individual clinical factors. Your doctor will help counsel you about how to best maintain your activities in order to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device.

Stryker Corporation or its divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: ReUnion, SmartLock, SOMA, Stryker, X3. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners or holders.
Content ID: RU-AWI-1, 05-2017

References

  1. Wiater, J. Michael, MD. "Shoulder Joint Replacement." Ortho Info. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Dec. 2011. Web. Feb. 2017.
  2. "Arthritis Facts." Arthritis Foundation. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web.
  3. SmartTrak US Upper Extremity Internal Fixation Market Projections
  4. Nam, David et al. " Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy: Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment" J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2012;94:e34(1-11)
  5. Armstrong, April D., MD, and George S. Athwal, MD. "Rotator Cuff Tears." Rotator Cuff Tears-OrthoInfo - AAOS. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 01 Mar. 2017. Web. 06 Feb. 2017.
  6. "What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?" Arthritis Foundation. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web. Feb. 2017
  7. Avascular Necrosis AVN of the Shoulder." Avascular Necrosis (AVN) Charity UK. Avascular Necrosis (AVN) Charity UK, 1 Jan. 2015. Web. Feb. 2017.
  8. Exercising with Osteoarthritis." Exercising with Osteoarthritis. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web. Mar. 2017
  9. Edwards, T.B. et al. “A Comparison of Hemiarthroplasty and Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in the Treatment of primary Glenohumeral Arthritis: Results of a Multicenter Study.” JSES. May 2003: 12:207-213.
  10. SmartTrak US Shoulder Replacement Procedure Market Projections
  11. Phoenix Shoulder and Knee. "The Benefits of Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement." The Benefits of Reverse Shoulder Total Shoulder Replacement. Phoenix Shoulder & Knee, 31 Oct. 2013. Web.
  12. Liu JN., et al. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty: as systemic review and meta-analysis. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2017 Apr 17
  13. Anatomy Diagrams designed with the use of: Terry, et al. Functional anatomy of the shoulder. J Athletic Training 2000;35(3):248-255
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