Causes of your
Shoulder Pain
Your joints are involved in almost every activity you do. Daily activities such as brushing your hair, putting on your clothes or reaching to grab something out of a cabinet require the use of your shoulder. When your shoulder becomes diseased or injured, the resulting pain can severely limit your ability to perform your daily activities and work.

The shoulder is a complex ball and socket joint that involves three bones and several key muscles. The three bones that form the shoulder joint are the humerus, scapula (shoulder socket) and the clavicle (collar bone).

The shoulder is very unique as it has the greatest range of motion of any joint in the body. The shoulder can rotate, spin, and translate allowing for global movement to position the hand anywhere in space.

A smooth substance called articular cartilage covers the surface of the bones where they touch each other within a joint. This articular cartilage acts as a cushion between the bones. In addition, lubricated sacs of tissue called bursae also protect muscles and tendons, allowing them to slide against each other with less friction

Unlike the hip joint, which is also considered a ball and socket joint, the healthy shoulder is not as constrained within the bony anatomy. The shoulder has the ability to glide and move due to the important soft tissue (muscles and ligaments) that support the top of the humerus (ball) to the glenoid (shoulder socket).

There are 4 very important muscles of the shoulder that work together to keep the humeral head (ball) in proper position against the glenoid (socket). A common name for this muscle group is the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is key in providing stability and balance to the shoulder joint. Proper rotator cuff balance is essential for arm lifting and rotation.1

Shoulder diagram e07a1ba1ed0a8cb80199918a97772f86e521a7db06bf392a9339c8be73f536cf

Common Causes of Shoulder Pain

Osteoarthritis (OA) is sometimes called degenerative arthritis because it is a "wearing out" condition involving the breakdown of cartilage and bones. With osteoarthritis, the cushioning cartilage at the end of the humerus may have worn down, making shoulder movement painful as bone rubs against bone.

Shoulder OA commonly occurs many years following a shoulder injury, such as a dislocation, that has led to joint instability and repeated shoulder dislocations ‐ damaging the shoulder to the point that OA develops.

Infographics  0028 f14eabc52e8dc399f49d4dc6979edfb098993fac203872a8442cb670095c0442
Infographics  0029 e7a229fc80833b582a29c0930ea8808febf9f142b94a0495339d2cdc02e66248

Post-Traumatic arthritis may develop after an injury to the shoulder joint in which the bone and cartilage do not heal properly. The joint is no longer smooth and scar tissue develops. The scar tissue causes pain in the shoulder joint.1

Cuff tear arthropathy may develop after an significant injury to the rotator cuff muscle(s). In the presence of cuff tear arthropathy, multiple bony and soft tissues changes are present which may decrease the function and strength of your arm.4

Infographics  0030 615fd1a64f88b98dae62dca52ed5c29d2b28cd7ee1df01a2d0ea42da43f10409
Infographics  0031 62c8d26e7693ba33f1000f6e492d2a4f898ec2ea56480c54eb066ec61c7434d2

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune response negatively affects the lining of the joints (called the synovial membrane), causing chronic inflammation and pain. The synovium becomes thickened and inflamed. In turn, too much synovial fluid is produced within the joint space, which causes a chronic inflammation that damages the cartilage, and wears out the ball and socket. This results in cartilage loss, pain, and stiffness.6

Avascular Necrosis (AVN) results when bone is deprived of its normal blood supply. Without proper nutrition from the blood, the bone's structure weakens, may collapse and damage the cartilage. Since this is most often seen at the ends of bones, your joints may be greatly affected. This is especially true of the shoulder joint and most commonly appears at the top end of the upper arm bone, the long bone that extends from the elbow to the shoulder.1

Infographics  0032 51055f23ce1385bf12f5c86a320915417543ce365c17ff2af5c702fbf132b591
Treatment Options for Shoulder Pain
Take the first step towards returning to the everyday activities you enjoy by scheduling an appointment with a surgeon today. Your orthopedic surgeon will review and discuss their diagnosis with you. Based on his/her diagnosis, your treatment options may include:
  • Rest
  • Medication (pain and/or NSAIDs)
  • Physical therapy
  • Steroid injections
  • Shoulder replacement surgery
Infographics  0033 71ea76ec5219c87e2c9e971da3c69e2c09250a634551431bf2b78e8793d1399c
Don't Let Shoulder Pain Slow You Down

If you haven't experienced adequate relief with medication and other conservative treatments, shoulder replacement may provide the relief from your arthritis pain and may enable you to return to your favorite activities. Whether you are exploring treatment options or considering joint replacement, Stryker's complimentary local joint pain seminars can provide you with more information.9

It's Your Move. Register Now.

Find a Local Surgeon
Need More Info


IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT SHOULDER REPLACEMENT

ReUnion System Indications for Use:

For use as a Hemi or Total Shoulder Replacement: Aseptic necrosis of the humeral head; Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or posttraumatic arthritis; Proximal humeral fracture and/or dislocation; Clinical management problems where arthrodesis or alternative reconstructive techniques are less likely to achieve satisfactory results; Revision of previous unsuccessful total shoulder replacement, resurfacing or other procedure.

Glenoid components are intended for cemented use only. The humeral stem components are intended for both cemented and cementless use. In the case of revision, when ReUnion TSA humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a total shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral and glenoid components, if the natural glenoid provides sufficient bone stock, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a hemiarthroplasty to a total shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing total shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary total shoulder arthroplasty. It is also indicated for conversion to a hemiarthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral components, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a total or ReUnion RSA reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a hemiarthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing hemiarthroplasty to a secondary hemiarthroplasty, in treatment of previously failed shoulder arthroplasty cases where revision to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty is inappropriate.

ReUnion Reverse Arthroplasty System (RSA): The ReUnion RSA Shoulder System is intended for primary, fracture, or revision of total Shoulder replacement. The patient’s joint must be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the selected implant(s), and a functional deltoid muscle is necessary to use the device. The patient’s joint must have gross rotator cuff deficiency, a functional deltoid muscle and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the selected implant(s). Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis; Proximal humeral fracture; Revision of previously failed shoulder joint replacement; Glenoid Baseplate components are intended for cementless use with the addition of screw fixation; The Humeral Stem components are intended for both cemented and cementless use; In the case of revision, when ReUnion TSA humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

In conjunction with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, ReUnion TSA humeral stems can be converted from a hemi or total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary reverse shoulder arthroplasty, in treatment of a grossly deficient rotator cuff with sever arthropathy or previously failed joint replacement with a grossly deficient rotator cuff. The patient must have a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s).

The ReUnion RFX System, when used with ReUnion TSA Humeral and Glenoid components, is indicated for use as a Hemi or Total Shoulder Replacement: Aseptic necrosis of the humeral head; Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from: degenerative arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or posttraumatic Arthritis; Proximal humeral fractures and/or dislocation; Clinical management problems where arthrodesis or alternative reconstructive techniques are less likely to achieve satisfactory results; Revision of previous unsuccessful total shoulder replacement, resurfacing or other procedure. In the case of revision, when ReUnion RFX humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a total shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral and glenoid components, if the natural glenoid provides sufficient bone stock, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a hemiarthroplasty to a total shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing total shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary total shoulder arthroplasty. It is also indicated for conversion to a hemiarthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion TSA humeral components, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a total or reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a hemiarthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing hemiarthroplasty to a secondary hemiarthroplasty, in treatment of previously failed shoulder arthroplasty cases where revision to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty is inappropriate. The glenoid components are intended for cemented use only. When used with ReUnion RSA Humeral and Glenoid Components

The ReUnion RFX System, when used with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, is intended for primary, fracture, or revision total shoulder replacement. The patient’s joint must have gross rotator cuff deficiency, a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s). Painful, disabling joint disease of the shoulder resulting from degenerative arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis; Proximal humeral fractures; Revisions of previously failed shoulder joint replacements.

In the case of revision, when ReUnion RFX humeral stems are well fixed, the system is indicated for conversion to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty. In conjunction with ReUnion RSA humeral and glenoid components, ReUnion RFX humeral stems can be converted from a hemi or total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty, as well as revised from an existing reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a secondary reverse shoulder arthroplasty, in treatment of a grossly deficient rotator cuff with severe arthropathy or previously failed joint replacement with a grossly deficient rotator cuff. The patient must have a functional deltoid muscle, and be anatomically and structurally suited to receive the implant(s). Glenoid Baseplate components are intended for cementless use with the addition of screw fixation. Source: Stryker Instructions for Use K161863


The information presented is for educational purposes only. Stryker is not dispensing medical advice. Please speak to your doctor to decide which type of surgery is right for you. Only your doctor can make the medical judgment which products and treatments are right for your own individual condition. As with any surgery, joint replacement surgery carries certain risks. Your surgeon will explain all the possible complications of the surgery, as well as side effects. Additionally, the lifetime of a joint replacement product is not infinite and varies with each individual. Also, each patient will experience a different post-operative activity level, depending on their own individual clinical factors. Your doctor will help counsel you about how to best maintain your activities in order to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device.

Stryker Corporation or its divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: ReUnion, SmartLock, SOMA, Stryker, X3. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners or holders.
Content ID: RU-AWI-1, 05-2017

References

  1. Wiater, J. Michael, MD. "Shoulder Joint Replacement." Ortho Info. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Dec. 2011. Web. Feb. 2017.
  2. "Arthritis Facts." Arthritis Foundation. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web.
  3. SmartTrak US Upper Extremity Internal Fixation Market Projections
  4. Nam, David et al. " Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy: Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment" J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2012;94:e34(1-11)
  5. Armstrong, April D., MD, and George S. Athwal, MD. "Rotator Cuff Tears." Rotator Cuff Tears-OrthoInfo - AAOS. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 01 Mar. 2017. Web. 06 Feb. 2017.
  6. "What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?" Arthritis Foundation. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web. Feb. 2017
  7. Avascular Necrosis AVN of the Shoulder." Avascular Necrosis (AVN) Charity UK. Avascular Necrosis (AVN) Charity UK, 1 Jan. 2015. Web. Feb. 2017.
  8. Exercising with Osteoarthritis." Exercising with Osteoarthritis. Arthritis Foundation, n.d. Web. Mar. 2017
  9. Edwards, T.B. et al. “A Comparison of Hemiarthroplasty and Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in the Treatment of primary Glenohumeral Arthritis: Results of a Multicenter Study.” JSES. May 2003: 12:207-213.
  10. SmartTrak US Shoulder Replacement Procedure Market Projections
  11. Phoenix Shoulder and Knee. "The Benefits of Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement." The Benefits of Reverse Shoulder Total Shoulder Replacement. Phoenix Shoulder & Knee, 31 Oct. 2013. Web.
  12. Liu JN., et al. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty: as systemic review and meta-analysis. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2017 Apr 17
  13. Anatomy Diagrams designed with the use of: Terry, et al. Functional anatomy of the shoulder. J Athletic Training 2000;35(3):248-255
Please upgrade your internet browser.

Our website was designed for a range of browsers. However, if you would like to use many of our latest and greatest features, please upgrade to a modern, fully supported browser.

Find the latest versions of modern supported browsers »

Note: If you are browsing in Internet Explorer 9 or later, and you are still seeing this message, you may be in Compatability Mode. Look for the Compability View icon in your Address bar, or the Compatability View and Compatability View settings from the Tools Menu in your Internet Explorer toolbar (hit the ALT key if your menu bar is hidden). If you are on an Intranet, you may need to contact your IT Support about Compatability View settings and whitelists.